Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it?—every, every minute?

Thorton Wilder, Our Town (1938)

Weddings are perfectly awful things. Farces—that’s what they are!

Thorton Wilder, Our Town (1938)

Anonymous asked
I heard you were a monster

I’ve been called a monster, a heartbreaker, mysterious, unwise, clever, and even jaded. But that’s beside the point.

You See: the Confusion

On gender oppressions in the placement of students in university housing.
The truth is: We don’t have what we have. We talked, we listened, we watched, we argued. And then, as if pithy consolation could replace our need, we were “granted.” Granted access. Granted birth. Granted right.Granted voice. Disabled while enabled.

The truth is: We “took for granted what was granted,” what was made territory by those territorialized. We are the eyes of a body. We are the body of a machinating dream. Imagine, will you. Imagine the implications of movement. Curt, broken movement.

The truth is: We lacked a voice when our voice was heard. Our productivity was met with inane hesitancy. The sociality of our questioning was invalid from the start. Who could imagine “the merge”? Who would dare change the system. “The cisdom.”

The truth is: We evaluated the structure, prodded at cracks, punctured the bladder. Poured water into concrete walls. Tore lines from doors, windows, and sinks. (Re)arranged furniture.

The truth is: Time was irrelevant in time much like humanity was immaterial to humanity. Paradoxes were drafted in “Yes, you’re right.” Drafted in the right diverging from the straight. Pit-pat.

The truth is: The pit-pat stirred dust. Dust stirred coughs. We coughed. They coughed. How much time must we afford coughing? We see the confusion in the air like dry skin from a scratch.

The truth is: Our truth is insoluble. Our truth is undefined. Our truth is a truth, in a truthful sense. Our truth is not matriculation. Not for men who are made “men” and women who are not “men”.

The truth is: The insolubility made the complexity insatiable. Incomprehensible. Men could not be men. Women could, then, be men. Incomprehensible. Boundaries could be drawn. Cut. Movement could shake. Insatiable. Imagination could exhale pollen, asbestos, paper fibers, skin cells. Dust.

The truth is: Imagination cuts boundaries, dust. We could move—curt, broken—and graft windows and doors. We could un-grant the insatiable complexity, prod the territory. We could pour water into it.

We could, the truth is.
[Written by Chase M. Ledin]

(Source: dreamwriters-journal.blogspot.com)

Have you ever noticed you can’t get away from yourself? There is no way to get away from oneself. You’re always there with you.

Geoff Herbach Stupid Fast (via sempiternale)

Literature is strewn with the wreckage of men who have minded beyond reason the opinions of others.

Virginia Woolf (via hemingwayslemonade)

(Source: winsnyu)

Go where you are celebrated – not tolerated. If they can’t see the real value of you, it’s time for a new start.

If God exists, what is the point of literature? And if He doesn’t exist, what is the point of literature?

Sex is always about emotions. Good sex is about free emotions; bad sex is about blocked emotions.

Deepak Chopra (via purplebuddhaproject)

We are living in a period of most wonderful transition, which tends rapidly to accomplish that great end to which all history points—the realization of the unity of mankind.

Colson Whitehead, The Intuitionist (1999) p80.

Anonymous asked
Top 10 memories from college

In no particular order:

1. Studying abroad in London, England
2. Humanities scholars group trip to New York City
3. Weekend vacation in the hills of Tennessee
4. Receiving 2nd place in the Denman Forum
5. Conference at Harvard University with Sustained Dialogue
6. Summer (2011) reading on the Oval
7. Designing the website for the English Undergrad Org
8. Living in my best friend’s apartment summer 2013 (BLAST!)
9. Coming out to my freshmen roommates (and them being totally cool)
10. Being accepted into Mortar Board Senior Honor Society

On Monday, March 24, 2014, The Ohio State University main campus updated its housing policy to include a case-by-case gender-inclusive housing policy.
While members of the Gender-Inclusive Housing Task Force wait patiently to hear more about this advancement, the university community has (quietly) been assured that all undergraduate and graduate students who express interest and need for GIH will be accommodated starting Autumn Semester 2014.
As a result of extensive quantitative research, the Task Force will submit its proposal for a Social Justice Living-Learning Community before the end of Spring Semester 2014. The proposal suggests a starting date as early as Autumn Semester 2015.
For more information about current policies at Ohio State, please visit: http://housing.osu.edu/living-on-campus/. Please send me a message (Tumblr inbox) if you have questions, comments, or positive input.
(Photo: GIH researcher Chase M. Ledin and American Indian Studies researcher Taylor Sawyer, The Ohio State University)

On Monday, March 24, 2014, The Ohio State University main campus updated its housing policy to include a case-by-case gender-inclusive housing policy.

While members of the Gender-Inclusive Housing Task Force wait patiently to hear more about this advancement, the university community has (quietly) been assured that all undergraduate and graduate students who express interest and need for GIH will be accommodated starting Autumn Semester 2014.

As a result of extensive quantitative research, the Task Force will submit its proposal for a Social Justice Living-Learning Community before the end of Spring Semester 2014. The proposal suggests a starting date as early as Autumn Semester 2015.

For more information about current policies at Ohio State, please visit: http://housing.osu.edu/living-on-campus/. Please send me a message (Tumblr inbox) if you have questions, comments, or positive input.

(Photo: GIH researcher Chase M. Ledin and American Indian Studies researcher Taylor Sawyer, The Ohio State University)

Anonymous asked
Three regrets?

1. Not saying yes to the first boy who asked me out.
2. Not making a conscious effort to make close friends while I lived in London.
3. Attempting suicide my freshman year of college.

Anonymous asked
Who are you missing most?

My great grandmother, who taught me how to love.

Anonymous asked
You're hot.

I’m flattered.